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Power Snacks for Busy Nurses

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As a nurse, mom and student, I feel like there’s never enough time in the day. When I’m rushing out the door in the morning, I don’t have time to think about what I’m going to eat. But it’s important for me to fuel my body and mind, so I lean on a few quick and easy snacks that are both delicious and nutritious! Here are a few tried-and-true snack ideas that keep me from getting hangry on busy days.

Grab-and-Go Protein

Protein is power, especially when you’re working long shifts. I like to make hard-boiled eggs the night before and throw a couple in a container. Squeezable pouches of Greek yogurt are great, because who has time to eat yogurt with a spoon? I also love protein bars and string cheese if I’m looking for something that’s extra easy to grab and go. Lastly, I like to keep a protein shake nearby and sip it throughout my shift. It’s healthier and more substantial than sugary drinks that would make me crash later.

Pick-Me-Up Carbs

About mid-way through my shift, I usually need a pick-me-up. Carbs are great for energy, so I try to get the biggest bang for my buck. Fruit is always a great option; I usually opt for bananas since they’re quick and easy to grab. I also try to pay attention to serving sizes, looking for more nutritious options. It’s far more satisfying to be able to eat more food for the same number of carbs and calories.

When you’re working a 12-hour shift, there isn’t much time to prepare meals from scratch. I never want to let myself get so hungry that I ravenously eat anything in sight, but I also don’t want to wake up an hour earlier to prepare meals from scratch. These healthy, easy snacks give me the fuel I need to get through even the busiest days.

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Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of American College of Education.

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