Master of Education in
Educational Technology

This program prepares educators and other professionals to serve as technology leaders by teaching them to track trends and leverage technology as an effective tool to support learning and meet the needs of school staff, teachers, and students.

Total cost at ACE

$8,990

(tuition + fees)

Compare with other institutions*:

$19,570

Grand Canyon University

$20,424

Capella University

$18,900

University of Phoenix

*Based on information provided on each institution's website as of August 2018

Applications due January 4 for January 7, 2019 Term

View Tuition Details

Key Features

  • Customizable: This program offers two Focus of Study options, plus an additional general track that’s completely customizable.
  • Flexible: Study on your schedule. Our online format allows you to plan your coursework around your life.
  • Technology-Driven Program: Learning how to apply digital educational tools in our digital environment allows you to see technology in education from the learner’s perspective.
  • Accreditation: Along with HLC accreditation, this program is accredited by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC)**.

For more information about this program, view the College Catalog. You can also ask questions anytime via chat.


Focus of Study

Nine of your semester credits will be spent specializing in a focus area of your choice.
View the College Catalog for full descriptions.

Digital Learning and Teaching

Educational Technology Core

You also have the option of customizing this program by selecting a General Track and choosing the three courses that best fit your needs.



Department Chair

Cathy McKay, Ed.D.
Administrative Faculty and Chair,
Department of Professional Educational Studies

Dr. Cathy McKay spent most of her professional career in the K-12 context. As she taught in both public and private schools, she worked with many educators on a variety of projects including process improvement, standard test readiness, and alternative educational opportunities. She helped develop two district-wide curricula in science and math for grades K-12. Additionally, she participated in programs to improve student achievement through data analysis.

While continuing her work in K-12 education, Dr. McKay transitioned to higher education through teaching at a local community college, where she developed and implemented programs focusing on student success, primarily in mathematics.


A Degree You Can Count On

We are, and have always been, regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, a regional accreditation agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. This accreditation guarantees that our programs meet certain levels of quality standards.   


A Note About Licensure:

While this program provides a comprehensive understanding of the intended program outcomes, it does not lead to licensure, certification, or endorsement. ACE offers several programs that do provide a pathway to licensure, certification, or endorsement and they can be found here.

Disclaimer

**Granted Accreditation by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of seven years: May 3, 2013 to May 3, 2020. This accreditation certifies that this program has provided evidence that it adheres to TEAC's quality principles.

Tuition

M.Ed. in Educational Technology

Total Tuition

34 semester credits x $235 per credit

$7,990

Fees

$50 Application Fee

$850 Technology & Library Fee ($25 per credit)

$100 Program Conferral Fee

$1,000

Total Program Cost*

$8,990

*This is an estimated value of the cost for tuition and fees. Amounts may vary depending on number of transfer credits applied to the selected program hours, the pace and satisfactory completion of the selected program credit hours, receipt of scholarship and/or grant amounts, and adjustments to tuition or fees as described in the Catalog Right to Modify Tuition section.

State of California Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF)

It is a state of California requirement that a student who pays his or her tuition is required to pay a state-imposed assessment for the Student Tuition Recovery Fund. For more information and to see if you must pay the state-imposed assessment for Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) click here.

ACE General Admission Requirements

  • Complete and submit all application components including the admission application, including the enrollment agreement, and payment agreement.
  • Submit the nonrefundable application fee.*
  • Provide official transcripts from a regionally accredited institution indicating successful completion of the level of education required for entry to the program.**

*The application fee is valid for one year from date of submission.
**Additional evidence may be required to fulfill state requirements, including but not limited to verification of professional experience, test scores, or an interview.

Program Admission Requirements

M.Ed. in Educational Technology

  • Bachelor's or Highest Post-Baccalaureate degree earned
  • Minimum Grade Point Average 2.75 on a 4.0 Scale for full admission
  • Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.50 on a 4.0 Scale for Provisional Admission*
  • Additional evidence may be required to fulfill state requirements, including but not limited to verification of professional experience, test scores, or an interview

*Applicants whose overall GPA, or GPA in the last 60 hours is below 2.50 will not be admitted to the degree program

International Transcript Requirements

All applicants must submit to the Admissions Office official, sealed college transcripts from each institution attended.

  • Transcripts that are international and/or not in English must be evaluated through an NACES-recommended agency.
  • Texas applicants may only submit evaluations from agencies approved by the Texas Education Agency.
  • International applicants must request the course-by-course evaluation. The evaluation report must show that the non-U.S. education is equivalent to the education/accreditation level required for the program.

English as a Second Language Applicants

All applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate competence in the English language as demonstrated in one of three ways:

  1. Submission of an official transcript showing a degree from a United States secondary school or regionally accredited college/university.

  2. Submission of a transcript from a secondary school or college/university whose country uses English as a primary means of instruction, including, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand.

  3. Submission of an official minimum score on the paper-based or internet-based TOEFL exam.
    • The minimum TOEFL score required for the paper-based Test (PBT) is 550, and for the internet-based (iBT) Test is 80.

    • Applicants to the Texas M.Ed. in Educational Leadership program must submit scores from the internet-based (iBT) TOEFL An overall score of 80, and a score of 26 on the speaking section is required.

    • The testing agency must send test scores directly to American College of Education.

Admissions Appeal Process

Applicants have the right to appeal admissions decisions. Begin the process by filling out the admissions appeal here.

Courses

Explore the classes you'll take to fulfill this program's 34 semester credit requirement. For more information, a complete list of requirements, and course options, see the College Catalog.

Digital Learning and Teaching/Technology Courses

(19 semester credits)

In this course, learners investigate and use existing and emerging technologies to support content and instructional delivery, student learning and engagement, collaboration, and communication in online and blended environments. They demonstrate the ability to use a variety of tools, including those for information access and retrieval, to promote student learning and classroom/professional research and evaluation. Learners also analyze technological tools in their own workplaces, identify areas of need, and make recommendations for improvement based on costs and benefits. Learners demonstrate knowledge of the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and adaptive and assistive technologies to support effective virtual instruction for diverse student populations, including those with exceptionalities and English learners.
This course prepares learners to plan and deliver individualized, rich, and meaningful virtual instruction using best practices and evidence supported models. Through a variety of products, learners apply knowledge of the structure and components of virtual instruction, planning and implementing appropriate activities and assignments for diverse students. Learners demonstrate the ability to use technology resources effectively, seek alternative funding sources, and prepare a grant application to support the planning and delivery of a curriculum unit. Within the curricular unit, learners emphasize technology integration, the role of feedback in student achievement, the monitoring of curricular effectiveness, and the modification of curriculum and instruction to meet diverse student needs.
In this course, learners apply fundamental concepts related to learning and assessment in online and blended environments, including continuous evaluation, formative and summative assessment, and alignment of assessment to student learning outcomes. Learners use and evaluate current and emerging technologies to improve learning and assessment in ways that ensure validity, reliability, and the security of student data. They are introduced to and use a variety of tools offering opportunities for the collection, tracking, and analysis of student achievement data. Learners then evaluate the ability of the technologies to support authentic and performance-based assessment in written assignments, simulations and games, individual and collaborative projects, and portfolios. Finally, learners link learning and assessment by developing a standards-based unit plan demonstrating the ability to clearly communicate assessment criteria, provide prompt and personalized feedback, monitor student progress, inform instruction, guide student management of coursework and resources, and develop interventions.
Using principles, theories, and models of curriculum design, learners build a school wide, standards-based technology curriculum that supports and enhances existing subject and content curriculum. Using the results of a current practices analysis, learners construct a measurable curriculum plan that promotes the integration and application of technology skills into the learning process, demonstrates the ability to differentiate instruction, and supports the needs of a diverse student population. Additionally, learners prepare an implementation timeline and presentation to introduce the curriculum which identify the supportive role of the educational technology leader in helping students to achieve technology standards. Learners also demonstrate understanding of digital equity issues and strategies for resolving differing levels of access to technology resources.
Applying principles of instructional design and adult learning, learners demonstrate a broad understanding of their professional environment by developing products to support continuous professional growth within the organization. Learners identify and evaluate technologies to facilitate and improve collaboration, productivity, communication, and instruction for all organizational stakeholders. They also design a professional development plan based on best practices and emphasizing legal and ethical guidelines specific to blended and online learning environments. Within the context of professional environments, academic integrity and dishonesty, personal and professional learning networks, and digital citizenship are major topics.
Learners will become proficient in researching and evaluating networks, hardware and software commonly used in educational settings. Learners will investigate and share issues related to planning, purchasing, and integrating new systems and supporting existing systems. Operating systems maintenance and trouble-shooting strategies will be explored in the context of developing an instructional manual and training for a technology management team. Security concerns related to identity protection and filtering will also be explored.
The Capstone Experience is designed for candidates to demonstrate and document the impact of their knowledge and competencies gained throughout and as a result of this Educational Technology the program. It does this by having candidates provide specific artifacts produced along with or as a result of their courses' application assignments. Candidates align their work with the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Educational Technology Facilitators as established by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) in collaboration with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Opportunities to use technology in synthesizing and reflecting upon their learning and future are also provided, culminating in students' construction of their own online electronic portfolio to provide a highly personalized framework for their planning and professional documentation beyond graduation.

Research Courses

(3 semester credits)

This course enables students to become informed consumers of educational research and to develop skills that prepare them to carry out action research in their schools and classrooms. An emphasis is placed on providing students with knowledge that they can apply in determining whether particular research findings are relevant to their leadership and instructional practices and to distinguish between trustworthy and non-trustworthy research. Throughout the course, students identify the elements that scientifically-based research and action research share. Emphasis is placed on how research can become a vital and relevant tool for teachers and school leaders.

Teaching/Learning Core Courses

(3 semester credits)

This course reviews data related to the effectiveness of educational initiatives emphasizing evidence-based instructional design models used to assess and instruct students with diverse learning needs. Special attention is given to inclusion of traditionally underrepresented learner populations, i.e.; special education, LEP, economically disadvantaged, and ethnic minorities.

Focus of Study

Customize this degree by choosing a three-course Focus of Study to fulfill the remaining nine semester credits.

Digital Learning and Teaching

(9 semester credits)

This course examines the impact of technology on learning as well as how today's student navigates a media-rich world. Topics include the human-computer interface, technology and the brain, diffusion of innovations, and connectivity through social media. The course considers trends and issues in educational technologies as well as research into the effects of technology on society.
This course uses a project-based approach in studying technology in education, best practices for classroom teachers, and strategies for professional development in light of emerging technologies. The course addresses 21st century standards for education, educators' digital presence, cloud computing, and digital ethics.
This course draws from multiple disciplines to explore design and strategies for computer- and web-based learning. Special attention is paid to collaborative learning, interactivity, assessment, and best use of technology tools.

Educational Technology Core

(9 semester credits)

Embracing the value of assessment and evaluation is the first step in improving learner outcomes through datadriven decision-making. This course develops relevant competencies and promotes a healthy balance of utilizing formative and summative assessments, evaluation practices, and data to inform and guide integrated curriculum development and instructional delivery. Assessments can provide facilitators with the knowledge and skills required to meet the needs of diverse learners in a variety of school and organizational settings.
Learners attain a broad overview of best practices in online learning processes, including an exploration of major theories and concepts, paradigm shifts, current trends, and issues in online and blended learning and virtual instruction. They consider diverse perspectives related to technological change and acquire best practices for connecting with students and their families and promoting student engagement, independence, and self-assessment. From the perspective of preparing students to be critical consumers of information and producers of knowledge, learners increase their knowledge of 21st century information literacy skills and strategies to prepare their students for participation in the global community. Ethical and legal practices, including those related to intellectual freedom, privacy, and adaptive and assistive services, are explored and applied in various contexts. Learners use their knowledge to design appropriate learning experiences, assess student readiness, provide opportunities for student self-assessment, and create and communicate learning objectives.
Learners apply psychological theories and instructional design models and principles to a continuum of learning environments, including face-to-face, blended, and online. They demonstrate the ability to manage and adapt learning experiences and instruction to each environment by emphasizing inclusion and collaboration, identifying and analyzing learners and learning tasks, goals, objectives, and assessments. Learners develop products in which they establish learning expectations, promote student-instructor and student-instructor interactions, determine instructional strategies and appropriate materials, and design formative and summative evaluations. Cybersecurity and cyberbullying are addressed within the context of effective learning environments.

General Track

(9 semester credits)

Any three of courses from the courses above.